Doctors and Fat Patients

Cartoon by Barry


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TRANSCRIPT OF CARTOON
This cartoon has four panels.

PANEL 1
The panel shows a doctor, with thick-framed glasses, neat shoulder-length white hair, and holding a clipboard, in an examining room talking to a patient. The patient is wearing striped pants and a square-collar short sleeved blouse, and has her dark hair in a bun. The patient is sitting on one of those patient examination tables they have in doctors’ offices.

The patient is using her right hand to hold out her left arm, which is not connected to her body, to show it to the doctor.

Important: The doctor is thin, the patient is fat.

The doctor is calm; the patient is also calm, but also concerned.

DOCTOR: Hi, I’m doctor Douglas. What seems to be the problem?
PATIENT: I woke up this morning and my arm had fallen off.

PANEL 2
The doctor, still speaking calmly, is looking down at the patient’s body. The patient, still holding her detached left arm in her right hand, looks a bit annoyed.

DOCTOR: Hmmmm…. First thing, let’s get you on a diet.
PATIENT: A diet? To reconnect my arm?

PANEL 3
A shot from behind the doctor, looking over the doctor’s shoulder at the patient. The patient is now quite angry, raising her voice.

DOCTOR: Your weight is the real issue here… How many times a day do you eat fast food?
PATIENT: I’M HERE ABOUT MY ARM!

PANEL 4
The doctor, now alone, sits at a desk in an office (desk lamp, degree on wall, books on a shelf). The doctor is typing on a laptop, and looks peeved. Above her, we see words in the air showing what she’s typing.

DOCTOR (writing on laptop): “Patient was uncooperative…”

Posted in Barry's favorites, Fat Acceptance, Health care, Social Justice |

What We Tell Fat People

Cartoon by Barry

Transcript:

Title: What We Tell Fat People

Panel 1

(A man with a TV for a head is pointing at a woman in an aqua shirt and a gray skirt. The woman, who is fat, looks sad.)

TVHEAD: I’m popular culture, and I think you’re sometimes hilarious but mainly gross.

Panel 2

(The same scene, but now the TV Man has been replaced by a balding guy wearing a jacket and necktie. The woman is unchanged, and still looks sad.)

NECKTIE: I’m your workplace, and we all think you’re lazy and stupid. And we pay you less.

Panel 3

(Now the woman, who has not moved and still looks sad, is being talked to by an Uncle Sam like figure. He has his arms crossed disapprovingly.)

UNCLE SAM: I’m the government, and I think you’re a problem that needs to be fixed.

Panel 4

(Now the sad woman is being spoken to by a lady wearing glasses and a black outfit, who is holding up a rolled-up newspaper.)

GLASSES: I’m smart people in the newspaper, and I’m concerned you’re ruining our economy.

Panel 5

(The sad woman is now being spoken to by a female doctor, with a white doctor’s coat and hair in a bun, holding a clipboard. The doctor’s cheery expression is undercut by her harsh words.)

DOCTOR: I’m your doctor, and to tell you the truth you disgust me.

Panel 6

(The sad woman, who still hasn’t moved, is now being faced by… herself. Her doppelganger looks angry, shaking a fist in the air.)

DOPPELGANGER: I’m your self-image, and I wanna puke every time I see a mirror.

Panel 7

(Another fat woman, with dark skin, glasses and an orange sleeveless shirt, appears. She smiles as she speaks, spreading her arms in a welcoming manner. For the first time all cartoon, the main character’s expression changes, as she smiles back at the fat woman.)

SECOND FAT WOMAN: Hi! I’m the fat rights movement, and I think you’re awesome!

Panel 8

(Final panel. The second fat woman looks surprised, and the main character looks annoyed, as ALL the other characters from panels 1-6 loom at the main character, glaring. TVMan is pointing angrily, and the Doctor is yelling a bit.. Only the Doctor and TVMan speak, but the impression is that they’re speaking for the crowd.)

TVMAN: Don’t listen to her!

DOCTOR: She just wants to hurt you, you fat freak!

Posted in Fat Acceptance, Social Justice |

What If All The Defaults Were Reset?

Cartoon by Barry

defaults-reset-900

Transcript of cartoon:

What If All The Defaults Were Reset?

Panel 1

(A suspicious-looking young white man in a sweater, arms crossed, is listening to a magical fairy, who is speaking earnestly to him while hovering in the air on her two small wings. The Fairy is dark-skinned, has her head shaved except for a little poof of hair on top, has no arms below the elbows, and has two little feathered wings.)

FAIRY: When you’re not the “societal default” – white, straight, male, cis, etc – it’s like a thousand little weights!

Panel 2

(Sweater-dude looks angry, and has lifted his arms in the air to make a point.)

SWEATER-DUDE: You minorities always make a big deal out of nothing… I’m sure it’s not hard to handle!

Panel 3

(The Fairy, a wild grin on her face, casts a spell – we know because a caption says “casting cool magic spell” – and a big cloud of magic smoke appears where Sweater-Dude was.)

FAIRY: Okay, let’s see!

Panels 4-13
(These panels form a giant circle. They can be read starting with any panel.)

Panel 4

(A man with an eyepatch puts his hands on his face in a gesture of astonishment.)

MAN: You identify as the sex you were assigned at birth? Whoa! So what does your junk look like?

Panel 5

(A fat woman with cat’s eye glasses and a striped crop top is giving instructions with a cheerful, helpful demeanor..)

WOMAN: If you’d just stop undereating you could be fat. You can do it!

Panel 6

(An irritated looking woman with curly hair, arms akimbo, is asking a question.)

WOMAN: ¡Habla español! Esto es América!

Panel 7
(An older woman with a punk haircut makes a shrugging “what can we do?” gesture.)

WOMAN: Sure, nearly all the Senators and CEOs are women. But how is that sexist against men?

Panel 8

(A young person with tattoos looks anxious as they speak.)

WOMAN: Have you tried being queer? Really really tried? I only ask because I want you to be happy!

Panel 9

(An older woman looks up from a TV Guide, looking puzzled..)

WOMAN: Why would anyone watch a TV show about young people?

Panel 10

(A cheerful man wearing a yarmulke is giving helpful advice. His hands are flapping in the air around his face.)

MAN: Couldn’t you just try making stimming gestures? You don’t want to seem weird!

Panel 11

(A woman holds her hand over her mouth in a gesture of dismay and astonishment.)

WOMAN: You like sex? That must be so hard.

Panel 12

(A man in a wheelchair spreads out his hands to indicate being impressed..)

MAN: You walk everywhere? Wow! I could never live like that!

Panel 13

(A young Black woman looks at the viewer with a friendly “just asking questions” expression.)

WOMAN: Why do white people talk with that accent? And can I touch your hair?

Panel 14

(This panel is surrounded by the circle formed by panels 4-13. It shows Sweater-Dude, wide-eyed and panicked, hands on the sides of his face.)

SWEATER-DUDE: What’s happening?

Panel 15
(This panel, occupying the bottom third of the comic, shows the Fairy speaking directly to the viewer. In the background, we can see Sweater-Dude, with the giant circle formed by panels 4-13 on his back. Sweater-Dude is trembling with the effort of holding up so much weight.)

FAIRY: If you have to lift this weight every day of your entire life…

Plus the weight of historical inequalities plus the weight of institutional oppression…

It can all add up to a crushing load!

If that weight looks petty to you … Maybe that’s because it’s not on your back.

Posted in Anti-racist cartoons, Fat Acceptance, Feminist cartoons, LGBT cartoons, Social Justice |

Why Feminists Shouldn’t Use “Neckbeard”

Cartoon by Barry

neckbeard-745


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TRANSCRIPT OF CARTOON

(At the top of the cartoon, large cartoon-style letters spell out “NECKBEARD.” Each letter is growing stubble hairs out of its lowest third.)

(Behind all the panels is a large drawing of a fat person, mostly in darkness. The person has an exaggerated neck, and has stubble covering their lip, chin and neck.)

Panel 1

(BARRY – a fat white man with glasses, pulled-back hair in a ponytail, and a t-shirt with an exclamation point on it, is speaking directly to the reader. Barry’s face has a lot of stubble.)

CAPTION: What’s a “Neckbeard?”
BARRY: Maybe you’ve never heard the word “neckbeard.”
But in some corners of the internet, it’s a common insult.

Panel 2

(A close-up on Barry’s neck shows a lot of stubble growing there.)

BARRY: Taken literally, neckbeard just means someone with beard hairs growing on his neck.

Panel 3

(The word “loser” appears floating in the air around Barry’s head, with Barry’s head taking the place of the “O.”)

BARRY: But what’s inplied is that he’s a fat loser, lives in a basement, never had a girlfriend, and so on.

Panel 4

(A full-color drawing, drawn in a different style than the rest of the comic, is shown in this panel. The drawing depicts a fat, unshaven, shirtless man sitting in a windowless room that feels like a basement, laughing as he types on his computer. A poster in the background says “Internet Arguments Won” and has fifty handdrawn checkmarks; other decorations include a picture of Richard Dawkins, a fedora lying on the desk, a My Little Pony figurine, and a few atheist logos.)

BARRY (off-panel): Here’s a popular drawing – I don’t know who the artist is, sorry – of a “neckbeard.” You get the idea.

Panel 5

(Barry stands between a bald man with a van dyke beard, and a young woman with fashionable hair; they appear to be yelling at each other.)

BARRY: I find it fascinating that both lefties and right-wingers use “neckbeard” to insult the other.
It’s like the only thing that unites us is our shared contempt for fat, unkempt guys.

Panel 6

(Barry, now alone, addresses the reader directly, with an “asking a question” expression.)

BARRY: When feminists call someone a “neckbeard,” it’s usually a guy who just said something misogynistic.
I’m all for criticizing misogynists, but I have to ask – why use that word?

Panel 7
(Barry is holding up a suitcase. The suitcase is labeled “neckbeard.”)

BARRY: Let’s unpack neckbeard and see what’s inside!
Insults like “neckbeard” work by associating the target of the insult, with something understood to be repulsive.

Panel 8

(A close-up of the “neckbeard” suitcase shows it standing open. Four blobs, labeled “fat” “loser” “ugly” and “dork,” are emerging from the suitcase.)

BARRY(off-panel): It’s not satisfying to call people “anti-feminists,” because some people like anti-feminism. Instead, we use words that suggest things almost no one likes: “loser,” “fat,” “ugly.”

Panel 9

(A close-up of Barry, drawn to exaggerate his unshaven neck.)

BARRY: In short, “neckbeard.”

Panel 10

(Barry spreads his arms wide to make a big point.)

BARRY: But in a better society – a society most feminists want – none of the things neckbeard implies would be insults.

Panel 11

(Barry speaks to the viewer, but his neck (and only his neck) is now covered by a thick beard.)

BARRY: We shouldn’t insult people for being fat, or for not being able to afford their own place, or for being single.
Or for not conforming to society’s arbitrary grooming standards, for that matter.

Panel 12

(Once again we see the popular drawing of a “neckbeard” that appeared in panel 4. But this time he’s been drawn in a style that matches the comic strip. Three arrow captions point to him.)

BARRY(off-panel): There’s nothing inherently wrong with any of that. Good people can be all those things.
ARROW CAPTION 1: Donates to feminist causes.
ARROW CAPTION 2: Always kind.
ARROW CAPTION 3: Loves kittens.

Panel 13

(Barry leans over to look into the inside of the “neckbeard” suitcase.)

BARRY: If we keep unpacking “neckbeard,” we’ll find three more things in here…
First, the “neckbeard” stereotypes are also stereotypes used against autistic people.

Panel 14

(A shot of two jigsaw puzzle pieces, which fit together perfectly. The pieces are labeled “autistic” and “neckbeard.”)

BARRY (off-panel): In fact, when I was researching this cartoon, some autistic people told me they’ve observed “autistic” and “neckbeard” used together as insults.

Panel 15
(Barry addresses the reader directly, his hands in front of him in an “explaining” gesture.)

BARRY: Some (not all) autistic people have difficulty with things like earning a living, dating, and navigating arbitrary grooming rules. “Neckbeard” targets exactly those traits.

Panel 16

(A person with dark, springy hair jumps back from a sign which says “keep out!” in big letters.)

BARRY(off-panel): When we use “neckbeard,” it sends a message to autistic people that they’re unwelcome. It’s ableist as hell!

Panel 17
(A grinning white dude is wearing a “poor person” costume, which consists of a sleevless white shirt, with a pillow shoved under it to make him appear fat. He has makeup on his face and neck to simulate heavy stubble, and is holding out a cup with “give” written on it.)

BARRY(off-panel): Second, insults about grooming are clearly linked to ugly stereotypes about class.
GRINNING DUDE: For Halloween, I’m dressed as a poor person!

Panel 18

(A smiling, confident-looking woman with a full beard and her hair in a bun puts her hand on her chest in a “I am awesome” gesture.”)

BARRY(off-panel): Third, even though some women do grow face and neck hair…
WOMAN: And look awesome with it!

Panel 19

(Barry is drawn to be a circle-and-arrow “male” symbol.)

BARRY: “Neckbeard” is still intended as a gendered insult, and that’s a problem.
Because people’s sex or gender shouldn’t be insults at all.

Panel 20

BARRY: Do I think “neckbeard” is as bad as gendered insults that “punch down,” like b**** and c***? Definitely not.
But consider this: men who like conventional gender roles aren’t usually bothered by gendered insults.

Panel 21

(Barry now has a huge arrow symbol piercing his chest. The arrow is labeled “neckbeard.”)

BARRY: Guys who are hurt by anti-male insults, are often guys who are already wounded by toxic masculinity.
Why add to that?

Panel 22

(An unshaven fat man with a dorky grin, wearing a fedora hat and a sleeveless white shirt, points to himself with his thumb.)

BARRY(off-panel): One final point: When we stereotype misogynists by saying they look like this….

Panel 23

(A conventionally handsome man, with “good” scruffy stubble and a neck tattoo, smiles out at the viewer.)

BARRY: That implicitly lets misogynists who look like this off the hook.

Panel 24

(For the final three panels, Barry speaks directly at the viewer. In this panel, he looks a bit angry)

BARRY: Maybe it would be better if no one resorted to insults… But let’s get real. Everyone loses their temper sometimes. That’s life.

Panel 25
(Barry, no longer looking angry, shrugs.)

BARRY: But let’s at least avoid insults that devalue people for their appearance… and that can make fat people and autistic people feel unwelcome.

Panel 26

(Barry, smiling, lifts his left hand to feel his cheek.)

BARRY: Thanks for listening!
(Hmmm… Do I need a shave?)

Posted in Barry's favorites, Fat Acceptance |

The Fat Whisperer

Cartoon by Barry

fat-whisperer-1500

Thanks to Everyday Feminism for publishing this comic! And thanks to them as well, for the following transcript:

Panel 1

(A friendly-looking, thin, conventionally attractive white man – “The Fat Whisperer” – speaks directly to the viewer.)

FW: Hi! I’m the Fat Whisperer!

Panel 2

(FW points his finger in the air. He has a smug look on his face.)

FW: I help fat people by telling them things they’ve never heard!  Like “you’d look so much nicer if you lost all that weight.”

Panel 3

(FW has a confused expression. His hands are positioned like he is seeking answers.)

FW:  “Have you considered putting down the donuts and going for a jog?” (Probably they haven’t!)

Panel 4

(FW holds his hands to his chest, as if he is making a heartfelt statement.)

FW: Or I tell them “being fat could harm your health!” (I bet most fatties have never heard that!)

Panel 5

(FW makes a disgusted expression, holds hands, palms forward, in front of his body to demonstrate rejection.)

FW: But you know what I hate? “Fat Acceptance.” Gross! Fat people can’t “accept” themselves!

Panel 6

(FW has a frustrated facial expression, and points at his hand.)

FW: Fat people need shame and self-loathing! Otherwise they’ll get fatter and worse. Why doesn’t anyone ever teach fat people that?

Panel 7

(FW has his arms crossed in front of his body and wears an angry expression.)

FW: We can’t accept fat people. Because fat people are sinful and weak!

Panel 8

(FW gestures towards himself and looks proud.)

FW: (And if fat people are sinful and weak, that makes thin people like me virtuous and strong!)

Panel 9

(FW is beginning to look even angrier than before. His eyes and mouth are wide open and he is shaking his fist in the air.)

FW: Without me, who’d ever tell these people: Take a run, Lardo! Put down the Twinkies! Where’s your self-respect?

Panel 10

(FW has totally lost it. He is sweating and screaming with rage.)

FW: YOUR BODY DISGUSTS ME AND YOU SHOULD BE SAD!

Panel 11

(FW regains his calm and looks a bit sheepish. His clothes are now disheveled from his tantrum.)

FW: Er… I only say these things because I care!

Panel 12

(FW looks devastated, confused, deeply concerned, and as if he believes he is the victim.)

FW: But sadly, most fat people never hear any of this stuff!

Posted in Barry's favorites, Fat Acceptance, Uncategorized |

When I Get Thin…

Cartoon by Barry

The cartoon features a lot of small panels, all featuring a single fat figure (some larger, some less large). The panels cascade and pile up on a final large image at the bottom of the strip.

CAPTION AT TOP: WHEN I GET THIN…

DUDE IN TIE: Then people will appreciate me.
ENTHUSED WOMAN: Then I’ll write my novel.
PERSON IN GLASSES: Then I’ll have the lover I deserve.
DISTANT WOMAN: Then I’ll go dancing.
WOMAN IN ZIG ZAG SHIRT: Then I’ll buy some nice clothes.
GUY WITH BACK TURNED: Then I won’t be so shy.
BALDING MAN: Then I’ll deserve to have a lover.
WOMAN READING NEWSPAPER: Then I’ll look for a better job.
MAN LOOKING IN MIRROR: Then I’ll like myself.

(There are several panels at the bottom which we can’t see all of, due to other panels piled on top of them, but we can see little bits of characters and dialog, all starting with the word “then”).

The bottom of the strip shows a person with long dark hair, arms on hips, facing a wall (and away from the viewer) and glaring. There’s a big window, but the person isn’t looking out the window.

PERSON (in thought balloons): Then! Then! Then!

Posted in Fat Acceptance |

Top Ten Reasons Discrimination Against Fat People Is Perfectly Okay

Cartoon by Barry

fat_discrimination

Posted in Economic cartoons, Fat Acceptance, Labor rights & Unions |